Project facts

Duration: 2015-06-01 - 2018-05-31
Project coordinator: Università degli studi della Tuscia
Project consortium: University of Stirling (UK); Cyprus University of Technology (Cyprus); ALMA Sistemi (Italy); University of Copenhagen (Denmark)
Funding bodies: JPI CH; European Commission
Subject areas: Archaeology, Tangible Heritage, Built Heritage, Monuments - Sites, Cultural Landscapes, Conservation, Preventive conservation, Monitoring, Technologies - Scientific processes, Methods - Procedures, Climate Change, Threats, ICT tools, Changing environments
Budget: 683.194.00€

Presentation

The CLIMA project aimed at promoting highly interdisciplinary soil-oriented research to develop an effective tool for the authorities in charge of landscape preservation.

CLIMA has addressed the design and development of a multi-task platform, combining advanced remote sensing technologies, both from satellite and ground-based, with GIS application for mapping and long-term monitoring of archaeological cultural landscapes in order to identify changes due to climate changes and anthropic pressures.

The project has also targeted the development and test of an innovative ground-based gamma spectrometer to measure soil vertical/lateral disturbance.

The main aim of the project was to lead to significant advances in our understanding of archaeological cultural landscapes across the broader research community, the public authorities and in society.

Changes in the landscape have been analyzed by addressing different climatic and environmental conditions in Europe.

Impacts & Results

  • The CLIMA platform, as the major outcome of the project, has enabled the authorities responsible for the preservation of the archaeological cultural landscape to carry out an effective planning and implementation policy of preventive maintenance.
  • It has developed technologies, procedures and systems for the systematic and long-term monitoring of archaeological cultural landscapes to identify changes in the landscape due to climate changes and anthropic pressures.
  • The tool has also performed integration of satellite, ground-based and historical data to take into account in the evolution of the different historical and environmental contexts of the site.
  • The project CLIMA has developed an effective, usable and affordable multi-task tool providing risk and warning maps of the sites as input for decision-making authorities responsible for the preservation of the archaeological cultural landscape.
  • The use of the proposed methodologies has marked substantial progress in the definition of an important decision-making tool as well as a commercial service for the monitoring of the degradation process and the planning of preventive maintenance activities.

 

Banner: Havråtunet, Osterøy, Norway, one of the last and best preserved of the common farm clusters on the western coast of Norway. ©Trond Isaksen, Riksantikvaren (The Directorate for Cultural Heritage, Norway) All Rights Reserved